A technical answer to a technical question

While at the Boomershoot site one of the visitors asked Joe what voltage the transmission lines are over head.  He guessed around 50 or 100kV then noticed I was there and said well there’s the person to ask.  I have the disclaimer and will adhere to it.  All I will say is I know a lot about embedded systems, power systems, protective relays, and communication systems involving power and industrial controls.

I had looked at the lines before but never bothered to really figure it out.  I took a look at it and let my instincts take over.  My estimate was around 230kV but I would count the insulators at home and come up with the actual number.DSC_0011

So from the photo you can see there’s 20 insulator discs.  Three discs are approximately 35kV.

Crunching the numbers comes out to be 233.3kV.  230kV is a standard transmission voltage so the approximation is reasonable since it’s not sitting in between two standard voltages and isn’t way off in the weeds either.

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms.

He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.

About Barron

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms.

He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.

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