Booger Hook Off the Bang Switch

A San Bernardino school district police officer
accidentally fired his gun inside the district Police Department
building this morning, but no one was wounded.


“An officer was doing a routine inspection of his
firearm and it accidentally discharged one round,” said district
spokeswoman Linda Bardere.

Keep your booger hook off the bang switch.  If you feel like touching the trigger when it’s not necessary, just push that sucker right up your nose.

I know some firearms require you to exercise the trigger mechanism when getting ready to clean your weapon.  However one should thoroughly clear that the weapon is empty prior to dropping the hammer/striker.  Also make sure to drop the mag before ejecting the round in the chamber.  Less you clear the round to just chamber a new one.  You are responsible for every round you fire, even if you didn’t mean to.  Luckily in this case no one was hurt.

This little incident just goes to show that our “anointed” officers can and do make mistakes.

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms.

He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.

About Barron

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms. He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.
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