SSCC/ICHH–Two For One Combo, Denver

More than 500 people were wrongly imprisoned in Denver’s jails over seven years, with some spending weeks incarcerated or pleading guilty to crimes they did not commit before authorities realized they nabbed the wrong person, a federal court filing shows.

Many would like to think that the system wouldn’t punish or hold the innocent but the fact of the matter is, it isn’t perfect.  Personally I feel on erring on the side of the innocent.  To punish the innocent is absolutely unforgivable.  Letting some bad people slip through the cracks is the price we pay for protecting the innocent.

When you see horrible mistakes such as the following there is no excuse for law enforcement other than laziness.

  • Warrant is for a female, defendant is male
  • Wrong finger prints
  • Wrong person entered the plea
  • Wrong person paid the fine under duress

You have to think, what the hell are these bums doing for a living?

Yes it can happen to you!

via David Wilson

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms.

He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.

About Barron

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms. He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.
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