Red Teaming It Up

You know, this crap is just so easy sometimes.  Especially when they give ideas like this.

Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to find a jewel thief at large in each of five cities in the U.S. and Europe, with only a photo of the criminal to guide you. The State Department is testing the power of crowdsourcing and social media with its “Tag Challenge” on March 31, and the successful team of trackers will score a $5,000 bounty. Contestants will have 12 hours to find the volunteer crooks and upload a photo of the thief to the Challenge website. Finding five men among millions won’t be easy, so participants will need to constantly stay in contact and share tips instantly in order to claim the prize. It’s yet to be seen if the State Department will adopt crowdsourcing themselves, but this experiment could prove that Twitter is a heck of a lot more than a time-waster.

Given our uncles propensity to use black ninja suited jack booted thugs does anyone see the problem with this?  Anyone?

The problem is when you hear about a crime X across twitter.  You just report that guy in accounting you hate.  You just report your ex-husband that you caught cheating on you.  You just report that guy down the street who won’t give you back your tools.  With how readily they jump on the “kick in the door” mentality and the fact they could get judges to go along with it, you could get the door or the person you hate kicked in, with the full backing of the state.

Taking it one step further, if you are the criminal be sought, you can just flood the stream with false positives.

You see the problem here?  Utterly useless.

via Uncle.

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms.

He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.

About Barron

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms.

He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.

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2 Responses to Red Teaming It Up

  1. Justin Custer says:

    Any reasonable judge would NEVER give a warrant based on a tip from Twitter. Having said that, there any quite a number of unreasonable judges and LEOs.  That’s why I’m glad we elect judges in Texas.  It helps to keep them accountable.

    • Yeah, no reasonable judge.  How many even elected ones do you really think are “reasonable”?  You have judges signing warrants for blood draws in Florida at random DUI check points.  No probable cause required.

      Look at how quickly and readily they break out the ninja squad, do you really think they’ll let the lack of that little piece of paper stop them?