No Correlation Between The Law and Justice

Still don’t believe me?  Well here it is from U.S. District court Judge Keith Ellison.

Federal law does not recognize actual innocence as a mechanism to overturn an otherwise valid conviction.

What was the purpose of that statement?  It was his reasoning behind him denying a motion for a new trial.  Think about that long and hard.  Innocence is not a reason to overturn a conviction.  Being innocent does not prevent you from being found guilty and evidence that proves your innocence does not provide a route to overturn a bad verdict.

Translation: “There is no correlation between the law and justice.”

Remember, It takes a good prosecutor to convict a guilty man, it takes a great prosecutor to convict an innocent one.  Couple that with three felonies a day and you’re only allowed to remain free by their good graces.

via Uncle.

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms.

He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.

About Barron

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms. He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.
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