For the Sake of the FBI, Stop Innovating!

So I came across a nice article today.  The FBI was pissing and moaning about how the switch over to IPV6 is a problem for them to be able to do their job.  For example:

Any computer with IPv6 has built-in encryption called IPsec (which can also be available with IPv4). The New York Times reported in 2010 that the FBI was lobbying for a law requring telecommunications companies offering encryption to build in backdoors for law enforcement, a requirement that would likely cover IPsec, but the bureau distanced itself from that idea a few months later.

“The frequency of use should increase with IPv6,” predicts a network engineer at Sonic.net, an Internet provider in Santa Rosa, Calif. “None of this is good news for law enforcement organizations.”

But some of the technical details are challenging, and IPsec is still not widely used. Neither are HTTPS encrypted connections; Arbor Networks estimates that only 2 percent of native IPv6 traffic is HTTPS, not counting file sharing traffic.

The quick and dirty is that IPV6 has native support for IPsec, Tunneling, and a couple other things.  While bitching about IPv6, the also bitch about running out of IPv4 addresses and how that is causing problems using an IP as the identifier for the owner of traffic.

So let me get this straight, they bitch about network address translation, the end result of running out of IPv4 addresses.  IPv6 is made to help alleviate that problem gives them heartburn because it can make their job more difficult.

Well tough, you’re job isn’t supposed to be easy.  Though it’s not as if the boys in blue, especially at the federal level, really think the law applies to them anyway.

I for one welcome the transition to IPv6 and if they dislike it so much, I figure it is nothing but good for the continuing health of the internet.  The internet which gives everyone who wants one their own pulpit to speak their mind.

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms.

He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.

About Barron

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms. He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.
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