On Carelessness and Curiosity

I previously wrote about an entirely preventable incident.  I didn’t full realize though how much of a classic style incident that was.

Paul said Carlile, 31, was in a rush to get to a wedding with his family on March 10 when he got into the family’s van, put his off-duty handgun in a cupholder between the front seats and drove to Stanwood to drop off business cards at a friend’s store. 

First off, getting a good gun and holster helps prevent this because it should get put on your belt, ankle, whatever and left there for the day.  If in needs to come off, the holster needs to come off with it.

Second is the thing people always seem to forget:

Carlile’s son, Steele, was a curious and active 3-year-old with a fascination with guns and a disdain for car seats, Paul said.

I’m not surprised by this, honestly no one should that’s ever been around kids.  Kids are naturally curious.  The best thing to do is satisfy their curiosity in a safe and controlled environment.  Most certainly though, never leave something around a curious kid that’s dangerous or deadly.

What the father did was careless and negligent given the fact they were leaving their children in the car.  Not to mention the fact he was leaving the firearm in plain sight for anyone walking by the vehicle.  That is otherwise known as a great way to have a weapon stolen.

The worst part about incidents like this is gun owners as a whole get a black eye because this man was “anointed“.  The argument of the banners being, “If he can’t properly handle a firearm, how can anyone else be expected to?”  Never mind the fact that we push education instead of prohibition.  Prohibition in this case probably lead to the accident.  It’s the appeal of the forbidden fruit left within arms reach.  The better option would be to satisfy curiosity whenever possible while reinforcing safety and discipline.

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms. He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.

About Barron

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms. He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.
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