TSA Tab Clearing

There’s been a bunch of incidents in the news lately and many of them worthy of serious note.  My being busy with other more pressing items, my photo gallery needs to get moved post haste, I haven’t had the time to write up everything I would.

So I want to at least clear out a few browser tabs since these are becoming “old news”.

Capping a year-long investigation prompted by reports of theft in a baggage room at Newark Liberty International Airport, the Transportation Security Administration said it it was moving to fire 25 employees and suspend 19 others for failing to ensure that checked bags were being screened adequately.

So they’re not adequately searching bags but I’m sure that agent made sure to feel up Tiffany’s boobs, in a random pat down I’m sure.

One airport TSA worker learned the hard way this week that if you see something, you should probably say something — instead of stealing it.

Andy Ramirez was the only officer caught in a national sting operation aimed at gauging how bad TSA theft actually is in light of recent data showing that 381 officers were fired for theft between 2003 and 2012.

I am surprised that the laptops didn’t go 10 for 10 on being stolen.  However this is worthy of note:

Pythias Brown, a former TSA employee at Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey, who spoke to ABC News recently in his first public comments after being released from prison, said he was part of a “culture” of apathy within the agency that permitted corrupt employees – and there are a lot of them, apparently – to prey on passengers’ luggage and personal items with abandon, thanks in large part to nonexistent oversight and tips from fellow TSA workers.

“It was very commonplace, very,” said Brown, who admitted lifting in excess of $800,000 worth of items from luggage and security checkpoints over a four-year span. “It was very convenient to steal.”

Imagine that, a culture of stealing.  What that test did show is many are wary of “easy prey”.  When something seems way to easy, odds are it’s a trap.  One agent failed that test.

Lastly we have an incident out of my backyard:

The TSA is denying any wrongdoing involving the recent pat down of leukemia patientMichelle Dunaj. Dunaj says the screeners at Sea-Tac Airport made her lift up her shirt to check under bandages after refusing to give her a private search.

She also claims a TSA agent forced open one of her saline bags, contaminating the important fluid she relies on to survive. Agents also made her lift up her shirt and pull back bandages holding in feeding tubes.

Given their treatment of someone with an insulin pump, do we want to guess who’s story is worth believing and who’s probably telling the fib?

The TSA is merely a job program for idiots and the lazy so the training is remedial at best so most don’t even know the actual policies.  Show up with a copy of the policies in hand and they don’t care.  How bad can it be?  A GBR one of the attendees relayed a story about a TSA agent insisting that he hand over the key to his firearm case and allow him to inspect it without the owner being present.  That’s right, the agent wanted the owner to hand over the key that is NOT supposed to leave his possession  because that case is NOT to be opened without him being present.  Ultimately for fear of not being allowed on the plane he handed over the key.  See how this works, policies don’t matter at the national level, each local can do as the please because they put the passenger between a rock and hard place.

This is what happens when you give someone with less intelligence than a monkey the power to tell others what to do.

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms.

He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.

About Barron

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms. He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.
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