DHS now planning on harvesting DNA

This summer, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security plans to begin testing a portable DNA scanner, The Daily has learned.

They probably just want the DNA to verify your identity.  Except how would they do that unless they already had a sample on file?  What is most disturbing though is that DNA is exclusionary, not inclusive.  If the DNA doesn’t match you are clear, however if it does, there is a significant statistically likelihood you’re still innocent if the evidence is based on DNA alone.  Other forms of evidence need to be provided to illustrate your connection to the crime.

Many probably wouldn’t care, however this information is becoming more and more sensitive due to genetic conditions.  There is still the question of how exactly it’s going to be used, and if they’re going to try and skirt the 4th Amendment again.  Never the less, the rapid acquisition of power by the DHS is very concerning, and they’re only gaining more.

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms.

He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.

About Barron

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms.

He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.

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