Hope is Not a Plan

There  are a couple common sayings where I work.  Many of these sayings are extremely flexible and can be applied just about anywhere in your life.  Here are three of my favorites.

  • Hope is not a plan

Hoping that something does or doesn’t happen isn’t a solution to the problem.  This goes for anything from fiscal crisis to violent crime.  Some hope that they will not become the statistical anomaly, however hope is not a plan.  It does nothing to prevent or alter the outcome regarding the events concerned.  Hoping a man doesn’t stab you while he’s mugging you isn’t really a plan to solve your problem.

This can be seen with other things as well.  Hoping a child doesn’t drown isn’t a plan, that’s why there is rescue equipment at most pools.  Hoping a kitchen fire doesn’t happen isn’t a solution to deal with the problem should one occur, instead many have fire extinguishers in their kitchen.  Hoping a tire doesn’t go flat on your car doesn’t prevent it from happening, that’s why you carry a spare.

This also goes for dealing with legislation, both good and bad.  I’ve been following HB 1016 and SB 5112 so closely and contacting those I should because hoping it will pass is not going to make it so.

A plan is a series of actions one is going to take to solve or prevent a problem.  Hope is merely trying to wish the problem away or out of existence. 

  • Wait is not a verb

While the word “Wait” can be used as a verb, it is not actually an action.  It is used to indicate the absence of action.  Waiting for someone else to solve your problems is never a solution.  Waiting to do something is like letting a positive feedback loop run while providing no negative feedback negating none of it.  Eventually the problem will be so big you can do nothing about it.

Some would rather wait for someone else to solve their problems.  Some do this because they want to feel morally superior, others do it because they feel waiting isn’t a  problem.  The fact is though, problems get worse over time if nothing is done.  Calling someone else to solve your problem is still waiting because you’re not doing anything.

  • If you want to see the future, invent (create) it

If you want to see the future of something you care about, then create it.  Don’t wait for someone else to create it for you, they may even create something that you really dislike.  From a rights and freedoms perspective you can help cement the future.  You can work to get legislation changed, you can work to gather information and rally others, there are numerous things  that can be done to create your future.

Back when I was still growing up, the future was still quite uncertain regarding gun rights.  Thankfully many throughout our culture have stepped up to create the future we have now and are still working so the future is even brighter than it is now.

Can anyone think of any others that should be added?

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms.

He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.

About Barron

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms. He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.
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