SSCC #17–DEA in Fast and Furious

The DEA admitted involvement with Operation Fast and Furious today.

Michele M. Leonhart, the DEA administrator, said DEA agents primarily helped gather evidence in cases in Phoenix and El Paso, and in the program’s single indictment last January that netted just 20 defendants for illegal gun-trafficking.

We may never know how much involvement the DEA actually had.  The DEA is claiming limited involvement, and that it was indirect investigative activity, and they had no decision making capacity whatsoever.  My give a %!$^ meter is at –20.  If anyone in your agency knew that arms were being supplied to known criminals, you share culpability.  Given the DEA’s other recent activities, it is obvious their actual stance on the law.  They are exempt from the law.

State Sponsored Criminal Count: 17

Because nothing goes together better than drugs, money, and guns.  It’s the job of the DEA and ATF to make sure that happens despite the laws to the contrary.

H/t: Uncle.

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms.

He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.

About Barron Barnett

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms. He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.
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