Isn’t that what the FBI is for?

We’re learning more on why the U.S. Air Force raided a local gun store Friday. They say it wasn’t guns they were looking for.

The article goes on to state that they were investigating stolen military equipment.  If that in fact is the case, why didn’t the FBI conduct the raid based off the evidence provided by the Air Force.  Air Force Special Investigations is not civilian law enforcement, and has no business conducting operations within the civilian populace.

Do they need to recover the military property? Yes!  Does that give them the right to deploy military personal and have them lead a raid on a civilian establishment on civilian property?  No!

This is just another example of the creep of big brother throughout society.  It used to be doing something like that would land you into a world of hurt.  Guess the military is now just another branch of the civilian harassment corps.

Civilian Harassment Corps: Any government agency whose role or purpose allows the harassment, intimidation, or destruction of private citizens or their property.

Examples members of the Corps include: DHS, TSA, ATF, and the FBI.

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms.

He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.

About Barron

Barron is the owner, editor, and principal author at The Minuteman, a competitive shooter, and staff member for Boomershoot. Even in his free time he’s merging his love and knowledge of computers and technology with his love of firearms. He has a BS in electrical engineering from Washington State University. Immediately after college he went into work on embedded software and hardware for use in critical infrastructure. This included cryptographic communications equipment as well as command and control devices that were using that communications equipment. Since then he’s worked on just about everything ranging from toys, phones, other critical infrastructure, and even desktop applications. Doing everything from hardware system design, to software architecture, to actually writing software that makes your athletic band do its thing.
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3 Responses to Isn’t that what the FBI is for?

  1. Tamara Keel says:

    Uh, the FBI was there. So was the LVPD. And guys from the local BATFEIEIO field office. The USAF guys were just there to get their stuff back.

    The pelt on my wookie suit is long and luxurious and has pink ribbons braided into the fur, but this doesn’t strike me as out of line. If the USAF had their stuff stolen, then the USAF can have guys ride along on the raid to get it back.

    • Barron Barnett says:

      But there was one line within the article that caught my attention.

      Turns out it was the Air Force Office of Special Investigations that led the raid.

      Now it could be that the AFOSI just organized the raid and the journalist went wild. What I would expect is for them as you said ride along as you said, not run the show.

      Hopefully it is in fact as you state and not as I wrote. I actually reread it after someone in the GBC pointed out the line. At which point I went ahead and blogged it. If it ends up they were actually along for the ride, I’ll eat crow and throw a strike through it.

  2. Linoge says:

    … Wow. Granted, I was only a Legal Officer during my time in the Navy, and nowhere near a fully-fledged JAG, nor did I want to be one, but our jurisdiction was made remarkably clear – our physical base/facility/ship/etc., and our sworn-and-contracted military members. We could ping the latter for crimes they committed anywhere, and we could use the borders of the former to prosecute civilians, but if we tried to overstep those bounds, I can only imagine what the fallout would have been. His may have been a fictional character, but Admiral Adama was right about using the military as a police force…